Cheap Italian Ski Resorts

Italy’s best for budget skiing.

Livigno

One of Italy’s highest , Duty free shopping , Authen...

Great for:

  • Late season
  • Après ski
  • Non skiers

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Sestriere

Relaxed atmosphere, Cuisine & Culture, vast Milky Way

Great for:

  • Families
  • Snow-sure
  • Groups

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Cervinia

Great for beginners, Ski 2 countries in 1 day , Glaci...

Great for:

  • Snow sure
  • Families
  • Beginners and intermediates

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Sauze d'Oulx

Links to Milky Way, Amazing Italian après , Somethi...

Great for:

  • Après-ski
  • Intermediate skiing
  • Italian Alpine charm

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Bardonecchia

Superb snowparks , Own rail station , Bordering France

Great for:

  • Beginners & intermediates
  • Cheap skiing
  • Families

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

La Thuile

Ski 2 countries in 1 day, Off piste forest trails , H...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Beginners
  • Heli-skiing

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Canazei

Beautiful setting, Cuisine and culture , Great value

Great for:

  • Families
  • Intermediates
  • Sports

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Pila

Family friendly , Close to Aosta , Car-Free

Great for:

  • Scenery
  • Ski-in ski-out
  • Quiet holiday

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Passo Tonale

Glacier skiing, Cheap ski holidays , Sno many activities

Great for:

  • Families
  • Snow sure
  • Freeriders

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Selva

Access to Sella Ronda , Awesome Dolomite scenery , Ne...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Cross country
  • Foodies

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Top 10 Most Popular

We love Italy for cheap ski holidays: even when you’re waking up to charming mountain villages and UNESCO-listed scenery, ski holidays are tremendously good value in the land of La Dolce Vita.

Food, ski lessons and lift passes can cost HALF of what you’d find in France or Switzerland (heli-skiing's a steal here too) - and the quality of things gives the bigger ski nations a real run for their money.

Italy: Top 10 Cheap Ski Resorts

Thank heavens there’s so much snow in Livigno: The tax man couldn’t reach the place back in the day, which has made the whole place VAT free. From petrol to pinot to Prada, everything’s a jolly lot cheaper than you’d find at home. But we haven’t all come here for the shopping - skiers can also get fabulous value for money with the lift pass, which covers 115km of pistes, fabulous powder trails and Italy’s biggest snow park. Even if you were only here for the food, you wouldn’t be short changed: a pizza and wine feast for two at Bait Dal Ghet usually comes with change for €20, with bread, grappa shots and espressos usually on the house. And with a flat rate for taxi rides all over the region, nothings stopping you from making the most of every inch.

Europe’s first purpose built resort, Sestriere won’t be winning any beauty contests soon. But it does beat almost anywhere else when it comes to prices. We’re talking €6 a pizza at places like Le 2 Stagioni (probably the best you’ll eat) and lessons with Scuola Sci Vialattea for half the amount you’d pay in France. You get plenty of pistes for your pennies here too: 400km in all, and they spread all the way over the border into France’s Montgenevre. Self-catering often works out as the cheapest way to ski, and the cheapest apartments can come with access to wellness facilities for bit of cut-price luxury.

Sharing a ski area with the luxurious Swiss resort of Zermatt but costing a whole lot less, Cervinia’s a bit of a steal. This big town has all kinds of savvy accommodation, from bargain basement apartments to hotels like Club Med, where the price includes all food and drink, ski school AND a lift pass. Even if it’s not included in your package, the last time we checked, lessons cost half the price here than they did over in Zermatt. Eating out’s cheaper too, Copa Pan doesn’t do anything fancy but it’s perfect when good pizzas and fondue are all you need. Après is rather more pubby than piano-bar, with venues like Yeti loved for their good drink prices and big match screenings.

If you like your après ski lively but low-cost, Sauze is the answer. While the vibe’s lulled from its laddish days to be more laid-back, the place still knows how to have a good time. Just ski the Sportinia back to the main piazza and you’ll be met with drinks deals, freebies and happy hours galore. Those who go for hearty, no-frills nosh won’t be disappointed either. They do proper Italian pasta at Sugo’s, where you could probably share a portion between two, and the pizzas at La Griglia are huge with little prices. Then there’s the skiing: all 400km of the Milky Way ski area, which crams in snow sure slopes, Olympic pistes and even a taste of France in Montgenevre. In all it covers 100km more than the Espace Killy in France, but tends to cost a good £50 less…

One of Italy’s oldest ski resorts, Bardo’s perfected all kinds of holidays over the years, and cheap’s no exception. It’s a savvy choice if you’re planning your own transport: Having its own train station and being only an hour’s drive from Turin airport, you can compare the different routes to find the cheapest on the day. Apartments often come with the added bonus of doorstep skiing which makes life easier, while 2 and 3 star hotels serve as the perfect ski-and-crash pads, where you often get meals included in the price. Not that it costs the mountains to grab a bite out - Snow Food serves up good old pizzas and burgers starting from €6. With 100km of often-empty groomers, powder trails from 2800m and an Olympic standard snow park, you’re not short changed with the ski area either.

They’ve packed a lot into La Thuile: It has the lower prices and high-altitude convenience of purpose built Planibel, then there’s the added charm of the old village just over the river. A little more than self-catering crash pads, the apartments here often come with perks like shared swimming pools. Doorstep skiing’s the norm, so you’re saving precious ski time as well as money. And you’ll want fast access to this one: the socking great international ski area covers 150km of pistes shared with French La Rosiere. If all that leaves you hungry, Le Dahu does awesome pizzas to eat in or takeaway from €6.

Canazei’s gained a strong international following – a buzzing base in the fabulous Val di Fassa, where you can enjoy the Dolomites in all their glory, without having to fork out a fortune. It’s the largest town in the valley, meaning plenty of room for the likes of 2 and 3 star hotels, self-catered apartments and supermarkets. As well as having one of the best party scenes in the region, Apres ski Paradis is great for cheap eats, with bar food for around €5. In the skiing department, the local pass covers the entire Fassa area, but usually you can upgrade to the full Superski pass for about €20-30 more. Which in itself is quite a bargain, covering twice the amount of the 3 Valleys for about half the price. We’re talking 1200km of the most scenic slopes on the planet – and though they’re not fully linked, access is an absolute breeze.

Why pay mountain prices when there’s a full-blown town a lift ride away? Pila sits on the hill above Aosta, where you can stock up on goods at the big Gros Cidac supermarket (by the cable car), or sit down for supper in high street restaurants (there’s even a McDonalds). Accommodation mostly comes in the form of 3 star hotels, but they hog 5 star locations right on the slope-side – letting you ski straight out every morning. And while this isn’t the biggest ski area in the Alps, the 70km of blues, reds and occasional black have a tremendous snow record and cracking scenery: Looking out to Mont Blanc, Monte Rosa and the Matterhorn.

Passo’s ski area is first class, with sunny slopes reaching an uber snow sure 3000m up on the Presena glacier which stays skiable longer than most other resorts in the country. And while the resort itself isn’t the prettiest or liveliest of the Alps, it’s brilliantly friendly and convenient – easy to walk around and even easier to reach the slopes. It’s also home to some of the cheapest food and drink prices we’ve seen on a ski holiday: A proper Italian coffee comes with change for €2 euros, Il Focolare does gloriously traditional pizzas and pasta for as little as €5 and La Baraca do BOGOF beers at happy hour.

You’d think they’d be filling Selva’s every last inch with five star luxuries: The UNESCO-listed surroundings are phenomenal and access to the legendary Sella Ronda’s smooth and simple. But you can actually find some pretty thrifty digs here, with cheap self-catered apartments and a gaggle of no-frills 3 star hotels (which often manage to squeeze in bells and whistles, like wellness facilities and ski-out locations…). Apres is easy on the pocket too, with places like Kronestube serving up great beers in national costume and bellissimo pizzas in Sun Valley. There are 175km runs in Val Gardena alone, but last time we checked the full Superski area was only €20 more for a whopping great 1200km. Good news if you’re bringing sprogs - under sevens can usually ski free (with a paying adult).

If you're looking for a cheap ski resort, Italy has a lot more to offer than you might think.

Admittedly the cheapest Italian ski resorts aren't known for pumping out the cheap ski deals we're used to in eastern Europe, but if you want an excellent standard of on-slope and in-town facilities (with amazingly good, affordable food to boot) the Italian resorts come up trumps.

It's not all about no-frills holidays in the world of cheap skiing in Italy. In fact many of Italy's cheapest ski resorts are also its best, because they're big enough to include both high-end and low-cost accommodation in different parts of the same town.

This is the definitive list of the best cheap ski resorts in Italy; to read more about skiing on a shoestring, check out our list of the cheapest ski resorts worldwide.


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