Best Italian Resorts for Groups

The Greatest Group Skiing in Italy.

Sauze d'Oulx

Links to Milky Way, Amazing Italian après , Somethi...

Great for:

  • Après-ski
  • Intermediate skiing
  • Italian Alpine charm

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Selva

Access to Sella Ronda , Awesome Dolomite scenery , Ne...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Cross country
  • Foodies

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Livigno

One of Italy’s highest , Duty free shopping , Authen...

Great for:

  • Late season
  • Après ski
  • Non skiers

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Cervinia

Great for beginners, Ski 2 countries in 1 day , Glaci...

Great for:

  • Snow sure
  • Families
  • Beginners and intermediates

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Canazei

Beautiful setting, Cuisine and culture , Great value

Great for:

  • Families
  • Intermediates
  • Sports

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Sestriere

Relaxed atmosphere, Cuisine & Culture, vast Milky Way

Great for:

  • Families
  • Snow-sure
  • Groups

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Courmayeur

Pretty, car-free village , International ski pass

Great for:

  • Families
  • Off-piste
  • Foodies

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Cortina

Spectacular scenery , Olympic resort , Friendly local...

Great for:

  • Intermediates
  • Off-piste
  • Families

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Bardonecchia

Superb snowparks , Own rail station , Bordering France

Great for:

  • Beginners & intermediates
  • Cheap skiing
  • Families

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Madonna di Campiglio

Classic ski village, Linked area , Epic Dolomites sce...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Scenery
  • Snow sure

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Top 10 Most Popular

A lot goes into making Italy a top choice for group ski holidays. The laid back way of life makes everyone feel at home, and of course there’s the food - but a big draw is that skiing here’s quite a bit cheaper than you find in France and Switzerland, from lift passes, to lessons, to lasagnes…

That’s not to say you scrimp on quality: Huge linked ski areas (often gloriously empty) suit all kinds of skiers and boarders, and après ski’s dedicated to hearty food and vino, with some cracking piste-side parties thrown in. In these ten resorts, you’re in for a ‘favoloso’ week all round.

Italy: Top 10 Ski Resorts for Groups

Eclectic après and a socking great ski area are the makings of a terrific group trip to Sauze. The après here is legendary, and as soon as the lifts start to close, it’s time for never-ending happy hours: Whether it’s a chilled cocktail session at the Moncrons, log-fire and lager at the Derby or an Irish staple at familiar face Paddy McGintys, there’s no shortage of spots for a sherry amongst friends. You won’t struggle finding a restaurant either, from every kind of pasta dish imaginable at Sugo’s to sarnies and chicken curry at Rocce Nere. And if you thought there was a lot of choice in town, just wait till you see the ski area… The nursery slopes at the foot of the Clotes chair are first port of call for newcomers, while the lift carries experienced snow lovers up to the main Sportina ski area. There’s a lot of terrain from the 2006 Olympics to tear into, like Rio Valley’s snow park and the Women’s Downhill run to Sansicario, and skiing into France for an all-important tartiflette makes for a super group day trip.

A stonking 175km of piste comes under a Val Gardena and Alpe di Suisi Pass alone - and if that doesn’t cut it, nab a Dolomiti SuperSki Pass and the slopes go on and on for 1220km. The Sella Ronda should be on every group’s to-do list, a seriously scenic circuit that’s skiable for intermediates and above - but don’t forget the ‘Hidden Valley’ for spectacular views and a horse-drawn tow back to the main piste. Beginners aren’t forgotten, with some super bunny slopes near the village, and at the other end of the scale, tempting challenges come in the form of the World Cup Saslong Downhill and Porta Vescovo’s black runs. In the après department, Bar La Stua has an old school Bavarian theme (lederhosen, accordions and all), while Euro-pop pumps from mega sound-systems at Luiskellars. And when it comes to other activities, we love a good skating session at Pranives, and a wild dash down the 6km toboggan run.

A buzzing atmosphere and a huge snowboarding scene go a long way towards summing up Livigno – and there’s lot to say for the duty-free status too. Via Fontana has prices up to a third cheaper than you’d find in the UK; whether you’re picking up a Cognac for folks back home or a load of Lavazza for the office. Budget prices stretch to beyond the shops too - taxis in these parts have a flat-rate, which lets you get to know the whole area, and you can nab a hearty Italian supper (4 courses and vino) for as low as €15 a head. Whether your group are more après ski BAR or après ski SPA, there’s plenty to please: Marcos Pub is famous for its packed-out live music nights, and the Bormio Thermal baths serve up the ultimate R&R. Then there’s the skiing: with a number of lifts along the town, most hotels are barely minutes from the slopes. The award-winning Mottolino Park steals the show with its XL pro area, and the hefty heights of the Della Neve host some hairy blacks. Over 50% of the runs are painted red, with the best of the bunch over on the flawless Carosello mountain side.

With Europe’s highest ski area as its back garden and Zermatt its next-door neighbour, Cervinia has a lot of appeal to groups. Early and late season trips come with the assurance of snow sure skiing – the Plateau Rosa glacier area is skiable all year round and the snowmaking here is excellent. Beginners won’t take long to get hooked when learning in the shadow of the mighty Matterhorn, and the local blues work wonders for technique building. Miles of reds lead over into Switzerland, letting intermediates really explore, while experts have access to some of the finest off piste and heli-drops on the planet. The après is cheaper and more relaxed on this side of the border, with favourite bars including Grivola’s Irish Pub (great for happy hours) and the distinctly British Dragon & Thistles. Foodies won’t be disappointed, with good old fashioned pizzas and pasta at La Grotte and sunny seats on the balcony at Chalet Etoile. If you’re after something special to do together, experience the ins and outs of the mountain (literally) on a trip up to the Ice Caves.

Canazei’s the largest and liveliest base of the mighty Val di Fassa (not to mention one of the most affordable spots in the Dolomites). Everyone can choose a lift pass to suit them. There’s the Dolomiti Superski at the top end of the scale, for serious mileage on 1220km of pistes including the stunning Sella Ronda circuit. And then you’ve got the Fassa/Carezza pass, which still covers a good weeks’ worth of skiing at 230km. It also tops the après league tables, with Après Ski Paradis being the place to party when you come off the slopes – an unassuming log cabin housing DJ’s, dancing and grappa shots galore. With the thermal baths at Eghes Wellness Centre, plus a trove of shops on the cards, non-skiers are fabulously provided for. We love how reasonably priced the food is here; get everyone to Rifugio Baita Cianci for a hefty bowl of pasta or book a table at the Kaiserstube for a chilled evening of pizzas, steaks and vino.

If good quality skiing’s everyone’s priority, Sestriere’s high, linked ski area always goes down a treat. The choice of corduroy is extensive – from the ten local beginner runs to the mammoth Milky Way area for intermediates and above. Experts have a number of black runs to master, like the Kandahar Slalom and Kandahar Banchetta (both used in the World Champs). When it comes to the prize for ‘best group activity’, one thing wins hands down: snow paintballing is a seriously fun alternative to your usual ice rinks and toboggans. Sestriere definitely doesn’t fall short on bars to wind down in: There’s Brahms for a chilled vibe and Irish Igloo Bar for live music and late night karaoke. Besides being deliciously old-school Italian, the restaurants here are surprisingly affordable (we’re talking pizzas for €6 Le 2 Stagioni – and they’re delizioso).

Courm is quieter and cheaper than Alpine legend Chamonix (plus the pizzas are better…), but it shares the same spectacular ski area. Ski school tends to cost less than over the border - great news for newbies who’ll soon be snowploughing down the (often empty) blues on either side of Mont Chetif. Intermediates get the bulk of the area, with everything from zippy blasts to take-your-time cruisers filling a wonderful week on the white stuff. For experts, sharing the price of a guide opens up endless opportunity, not least the legendary Vallee Blanche run into Cham. And that’s before we even get to the town; a characterful, car-free centre of cobbled streets and side-alleys lined with shops, cafes and old-school restaurants that’s buzzing as the lifts close. Fill your rucksacks with toasty focaccia from Pan per on Via dei Giardini for the ultimate mountain picnic, or for a taste of nearby France book a table at Pilier Tavern for awesome fondues and tartiflettes that’ll leave the whole group grinning.

Cortina’s a classic, and groups after some Italian glitz and glamour will absolutely love it here. If you’re bringing beginners, they’ll soon fall in love with the slopes from some of the most scenic nursery areas on the planet. For more confident skiers, there are some cracking Olympic pistes to speed down, and the Dolomiti Superski Pass grants access to the Sella Ronda’s circuit’s (plus hundreds of other pistes). Even non-skiers will have a blast: Shopping is classed as a second sport on the iconic Corso Italia, and we could easily spend all week cosying up to a fire with a book and vinbrulé. When night falls, the streets are bursting with bars and gallons of Aperol Spritz (we like LP26), and restaurants range from the Michelin-starred Tivoli, to the simple, self-explanatory delights at Ampezzo Pizza. Italian mountain nightlife doesn’t get better than this, with a grand time to be had on the tiles of Disco Hyppo and Bilbo’s.

The journey here alone makes Bardo a winner for groups. Only an hour’s drive from Turin Airport and 15 minutes more from Chambery, it also has its own train station - so if everyone’s sorting out their own transport, there are lots of routes available. This also opens up options for non-skiers, who can catch direct trains to Turin and even Milan for some Italian town culture. When it comes to the skiing, each of Bardo’s ski areas has a different feel: first you’ve got the easy-going beginner runs at Campo Smith, then there’s tree-lined blues and reds of Colomion and Les Arnauds. These link up to snowboard-central Melezet with its Olympic halfpipe, and a short bus ride takes you to Jafferau with its high, snow sure reds and powder trails. Off slope activities vary, from good old fashioned ice skating to snowtubing and snowcat safaris. You’ll find a number of bars for après ski, all heaving at the weekends. Most sit along the Via Medail: Garage is an American themed option with happy hours and Al Cronin mix up some smashing Spritz cocktails.

Straight from a snow globe, Madonna di C’s a chic base with as much to see in town (churches, shops, even a ballroom), as there is to ski on the mountain. Lifts whisk you up to the slopes straight from the village - something you don’t often find in old ski towns, that keeps skiers and non-skiers from feeling worlds apart. Links to the Folgarida and Marilleva ski areas open up even more pistes (though some could happily spend the whole week in the Ursus snow park at the Groste station…). After dark, get the gang to Il Rustico Ballardini for an evening of wine tasting - with a thousand wine labels kept in the cellar even the most seasoned sommeliers should be satisfied. Or tuck into pizza at the charmingly traditional Ristorante Le Roi, before moving onto Zangola for a late night boogie.

Italy is the relaxed place to ski. With focus just as much on the food and wine as on the skiing. The whole experience is important when in Italy, not just the sport. With beautiful little villages to enjoy long lunches and plenty of sunshine on the south facing slopes, your group holiday in Italy can be a truly relaxing and rejuvenating affair. Our choices for Italy are firstly the Milky Way Ski Area, especially Sauze d'Oulx and Sestriere. This linked ski area is wonderful to explore and ski your way around, with easy enough routes for competent skiers to tour between the villages, sampling the cuisine, wine and culture along the way. With good conditions it is possible to ski all the way from Sauze d'Oulx to Montgenevre. Sauze d'Oulx is where Italian skiing started, at the turn of the 20th century, around 1899. It is known for its lively and welcoming atmosphere and good value skiing.

Sestriere is a good all round resort, with great snow surety, it has a very high altitude and great infrastructure for snow augmentation. It is often used as a stage for competitions and played host 2006 winter Olympics. Next is the Dolomite Superski Area, not completely lift linked, but with reliable local buses and trains included in your pass, you have access to the biggest ski area in the world. Let the adventure begin. It includes the resorts of Selva, Corvara, Canazei and Campitello in Val di Fassa to name a few of the 12, all of which offer the excellent Italian hospitality, food and wine and are steeped in beauty and culture. So much to enjoy in the area covering 1200km of pistes and 20 snow parks and all the while the sunshine lighting up one of the most beautiful natural sites in the world, the Dolomites themselves.


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