Off Piste in Switzerland

First Class Freeriding in the Swiss Alps.

Verbier

Vast interlinked 4 Valleys area, Vibrant and varied ...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Groups
  • Non skiers

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Davos

Off-piste mecca, long ski season, Classic mountain town

Great for:

  • Families
  • Non-skiers
  • Late-season skiing

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Zermatt

Glacier skiing, high altitude terrain, stunning panor...

Great for:

  • Groups
  • Off-piste
  • hiking

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

St Moritz

Stylish town centre , High-altitude glacier skiing, G...

Great for:

  • Late-season skiing
  • Non-skiers
  • Couples

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Nendaz

Vast 4 Valleys area , Fantastic off piste, Fascinati...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Off piste
  • Value for money

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Murren

Stunning location , Chocolate-box village, Fascinati...

Great for:

  • Experts
  • Non-skiers
  • Families

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Klosters

Impressive off-piste, Beautiful scenery, Favourite of...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Late-season skiing
  • Foodies

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Crans Montana

Sunny ski area , Quiet intermediate skiing

Great for:

  • Foodies
  • Families
  • Scenery

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Arosa

Awesome off-piste , New linked ski-area, Sunny, high...

Great for:

  • Off-piste
  • Beginners
  • Nordic walking

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Grindelwald

Classic ski destination, Exciting excursions, Linked ...

Great for:

  • Families
  • Scenery
  • Short transfers

Beginner

Intermediate

Advanced

Snowboard

Top 10 Most Popular

Switzerland’s high, iconic mountains play host to some of the finest off piste on the planet, and these ten resorts have the very best of it.

Clue up on avalanche safety, pray for powder, then hire a local guide to show you the greatest hidden stashes, or go-all out on the heli-ski trip of a lifetime.

Switzerland: Top 10 Ski Resorts for Backcountry

Posh parties and luxury lodgings aside, the off-piste here makes Verbier one of the world's greats. The Chassoure-Tortin “Wall” itinerary is one of the best mogul runs we’ve skied, but shuffle your way across the top bit and you can plummet into the Col de Mouches, a bracing bowl that eventually joins up with the lifts at Tortin. Likewise, the Gentianes-Tortin itinerary – accessed by the Jumbo lift - is a fabulously steep marked descent, where you can weave into your choice of a bumpy bowl or narrow gulley. If we had to choose one run, and one run only, it would have to be the Stairway to Heaven from this same Jumbo lift. Sure, you’ll be going down rather than up this particular escalator, but it’s a semi-divine experience all the same. The backside of Mont Fort is an insanely good ski, while the rocky face and cliff jumps of the Bec des Rosses are reserved for true powder professionals. Still, for those of us who’ve yet to reach championship level, there’s always the opportunity to watch it in action when the Freeride World Tour rolls through.

Davos’ gift to powder skiers is the Pischa, fondly known as the ‘Freeride Mountain’. This is the place to get back in touch with nature, where descents are marked and hazard-controlled, but left gloriously ungroomed (our favourite trail from the top is the long and varied Tschuchenberg). Over on the Jakobshorn, try the steep path into the eerily quiet Dischmatal valley to Teufi, where a bus will drop you back in Davos afterwards. For the ultimate day trip, jump on the Parsennbahn up to the menacing 2662m peak of the Weissfluhjoch, which has a reputation for lengthy, lofty runs, stretching for miles and miles over to Arosa and Lenzerheide.

Spend the whole week on groomers and you’re only scratching the surface of Zermatt’s world-leading terrain. Look beyond the lines and there’s a whole other world of steep, deep powder waiting to be carved. For starters, you’ll find trails of the hazard-protected variety totalling 36km: the best of them winding their way down the lift served, but totally ungroomed Stockhorn. The Rothorn also has a couple of brilliant itineraries, but beyond the marked sections, the unmarked opportunities never end. The Schwarzsee area is a glade goldmine that the locals don’t usually let onto (you didn’t hear it from us!) and if heli-skiing’s on the agenda, you must try the Monte Rosa. This monster mountain soars to 4500m, meaning one thing – your very own deserted, snow-sure playing field.

Just like St M’s dazzling hotels, the off-piste here’s in a league of its own. The powder on either side of the Corviglia run is great if you’re dipping your toes into the soft stuff for the first time, while you’ll find more daring descents from the Piz Nair summit with loads of natural hits to bounce off. You’ll find some theatrical steeps in the Diavolezza and Lagalb ski area, with the star of the show being the 10km Diavolezza glacier run along ridges of Morteratsch and Pers. While it’s Switzerland’s longest glacier run, only 300m or so is really testing – the rest’s a delicious powder cruise, finishing 45 minutes later at the bottom of the valley. For more mileage, head back to the Diavolezza ridge for Val Arlas (an alpine classic for its stonkingly stunning views) or ski La Rösa from Lagalb (via the steep Motta Bianca and glittering lakes).

Lifts link Nendaz to the rest of the mammoth 4 Valleys, but there are some cracking local itineraries to lap up before you head off to Verbier’s legendary descents. We love the Plan-du-Fou, which links onto a steep groomer down to Prarion. Dent du Nendaz has ski lifts taking care of the uphill climb for a softer introduction to the backcountry, and while you’ll need a good hour’s hike to reach Mont Gond, the fabulous routes down are well worth the legwork. There’s no denying that the Mont Fort’s king in these parts, and a guided drop down the back face of this glacier might just be the steepest, wildest ride of your life.

It may be Blofeld’s lair in the Bond film, but the real baddies here are Mürren’s powder descents. It goes without saying that you’ll need a guide to show you the best of them: the terrain is rocky and snow can be sketchy, but with a local expert in the lead, it’s an absolute blast. You’ll find powder stashes between pistes and under lifts, and that’s just the start… The panoramic drops from Schiltgrat and Birg into the vast white Blumental bowl are a mean feat but to really test your limits, point your skis down the back of the Schilthorn, where routes like the notorious (and knee-knockingly steep) Totenkopf (or ‘Skull’) dive down into the valley.

Despite its small proportions and reputation for refinement, when it comes to off-piste, Klosters is big - with some positively beastly gradients. If we could, we’d ski the Rätschengang (a 45 degree stomach drop to the base of the Rätschenhorn) over and over again - there’s nothing like peering out over the first pitch and seeing the finale as a speck on the horizon. Local guides can bring you up to scratch before you attempt the next plummet, the 6km Diritissima, which winds from the Weissfluggipfel down to an old ghost town and opens up some awesome views over Arosa. In spring conditions, a little insanity’s needed to tackle the Gotschagrat (a seriously difficult jump down to Bad Serneus) but you’d be just as crazy not to try it.

This power couple forms one of the most attractive ski hubs in all of the Valais and the powder offerings are a treat. There’s oodles of opportunity in the La Toula, La Tza and Chetzeron areas, and they provide thick, forested protection from any winds or white outs. Head down the Bella Lui to Mont Lachaux, or Col du Pochet to Les Violettes for hidden challenges that are a heady mix of high, steep and smooth. If you’ve got a guide, there are some beauties in the direction of Les Faverges. While it’s all about the deep, white fields and occasional narrow dive through woodland from the 3000m+ Plaine Morte glacier.

You’ll thank the heavens Arosa is also a bona fide spa resort, because a few days on the powder here will leave even the most seasoned ski-legs in need of some pampering. The Weisshorn, Brüggerhorn and Rothorn are brimming with zoomy couloirs, steep slopes and fresh stashes. Try out the trails flitting between the pistes on the Lenzerhide side for lumps, bumps and a whole lotta trees. The Hornli route over to Lenserheide has tonnes of potential; hire a guide and they’ll take you straight to all the best bits. This is part of the ever-popular Ski Safari, a circuit that visits Tschiertschen and a series of deserted fields and glades with pockets full of snowy treats. If you’re happy to hike, it’s also possible to do a trip to Davos and back, which takes a full day and covers some of Graubunden’s most gorgeous landscape.

When it’s in favour with the snow gods, Grindelwald’s powder terrain is nothing short of celestial. To throw yourself in the deep end, heli-skiing’s the way to reach the untouched mountainsides of the Jungfrau region, with astounding drop off points on the Ebnefluh and Petersgrat. Or, for an easier introduction closer to home, the itinerary that stretches underneath the Lauberhorn chair is a corker of open terrain that can’t be beaten after a fresh dumping. Under the Eiger’s notorious north face, the White Hair from the Eugerwand is a local legend with dramatic scenery - and a guide can show you routes from Mannlichen and the Lauberhorn which are like something out of a dream...

If you want to ski or snowboard the very best off piste resorts Switzerland, choose from our list of the top Swiss off-piste ski resorts.

All of these ski and snowboard mountains have at some stage held titles like "best Off piste resorts Switzerland" or "best back country snowboarding resorts Switzerland", or been included in the winners lists of "top swiss back country ski resorts"... they are the best Off piste resorts Switzerland.

Enjoy the definitive list of top 10 best off-piste Swiss ski resorts


← online or call ↴
020 3472 8899
more