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Baqueira Beret

With a history of non-existent lift queues, terrain that holds up against any of the big-hitter alpine resorts and a rather pleasing price tag to boot, it’s well worth opting for a change of scenery and a week of sun, snow and sangria in this brilliant Spanish ski town.





At a glance: • Less crowds • Gorgeous Pyrenees scenery • Huge variety of ski terrain

Great for: • Intermediates • Off Piste • Foodies • Heli-Skiing

With a history of non-existent lift queues, terrain that holds up against any of the big-hitter alpine resorts and a rather pleasing price tag to boot, it’s well worth opting for a change of scenery and a week of sun, snow and sangria in this brilliant Spanish ski town.


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Baqueira Beret Resort

Established in 1964 and developed by Spanish national ski champion Luis Arias, Baqueira attracts a predominantly Spanish clientele – his majesty, Juan Carlos, has his own residence here, which his children are said to visit nearly every weekend of the season. But don’t expect Espagnol to be the only language, or culture, you encounter in this remote region of the Pyrenees… In actual fact it’s the third official language, behind Catalan and Aranese - an offshoot of Catalan exclusive to the surrounding Aran Valley. With the nearest airport in Toulouse only a two hour drive away, French makes it in as language number four, having an influence on local food too and adding to the wonderfully cosmopolitan nature of the place.

The Spanish influence shines through in other areas – locals are late to bed and late to rise, so while slopes are scarcely packed at any time, you often won’t see locals out at all until 10:30am which makes for a golden opportunity for early birds to make the day’s first tracks.

Whatever time you make it out to the hill, you’ll find 35 lifts serving a respectable 153km of corduroy for plank aficionados of all levels. The majority’s suited to intermediates, with blues and reds taking up a stonking 79% of the slopes but don’t let this put you off if you’re at either extreme of the spectrum. There’s still a choice of beginner areas, plus a range of black runs bolstered by abundant off-piste and heli-skiing opportunities.

While it’s true Baq isn’t winning any prizes for its sober architecture, the rippling mountain scenery of the Aran valley more than compensates, surrounded by no less than five national parks. This is dotted in the lower reaches with ancient villages like pretty, old-world Arties and Tredòs, where it’s easy to pass an entire afternoon in some brilliant restaurants and tapas bars. Make the most of the views and take an excursion through the firs and pines of the mountain passes - snowshoes, snowmobiles and even dog-sleighs are some of the amazing ways you can get around here.

Stats & FAQ

Location: Spain, Pyrenees

Established: 1964

Open: December - April

Downhill: 153km

View our detailed Baqueira Beret snow forecast or snow report and see all live webcams, piste maps, road and travel maps and lift pass prices. For a picture of historic snow conditions see the snow depths month by month with our Baqueira Beret snow history.

Nearest Airport & Transfer Time:
Toulouse160km, 2 hours
  • Beginner
  • Intermediate
  • Advanced
  • 74km 48%

  • 59runs 82%

  • 25km 17%

Top Altitude:2510m
Bottom Altitude:1500m
Resort Altitude:1500m
Longest run:6km
Slope Orientation:NW/W/SW/S
Vertical Drop:1156m
Skiable Vertical:1016m
Night Skiing:No

Snow Report

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Web Cam

Baqueira Beret web cams
Downhill Runs:153km
Beginner slopes:48%
Advanced slopes:17%
Lift Pass Price: £160-£175 (adult 6 day)
Nearby resorts: Formigal

Skiing/BoardingSkiing in Baqueira Beret

If you’re a first-timer, make your way up to the beginner park via the Baqueira gondola, where you’ll find the forgiving Rabada and Pastores greens to master your turns on before graduating to bluer pastures. Easy-going blues run from Beret through Baqueira and on to Bonaigua, so if you’re quick finding your feet, you’ll soon be able to ski the length of the resort.

Tentative intermediates can ride the Jesus Serra chair towards Beret to take their pick of nine blue runs (we like the long and rolling Ta Baqueira) which lead down from there. If you’re more daring, take the far-left peak of Tuc de Costorias and cut loose back down into the valley on cruisey reds like Barlongueta and Parros. The resort’s central peak, the aptly named Cap de Baqueira, runs into a plethora of cheery reds like our favourite Mirador on the middle route towards the village, while tougher reds like Muntanyó can be found under the Tuc de la Llança peak above Bonaigua.

There’s plenty of territory for experts to tuck into, like the routes left and right from the Cap, home to challenging blacks like the Luis Arias and Muguet. Only the brave should tackle gut-wrenching couloirs like the Escornacrabes (‘Where Goats Tumble’…) or Deth Lac des Baciver, but on a clear day these are incredible. The Orri de Tredos black, which used to be a popular area of off-piste before the Saumet drag lift was built, takes a secluded path down the seldom-travelled valley between the Baciver and Baqueira peaks- another not to be missed.

Hire a guide to show you the off-piste that’s hidden all around; like the river-formed gullies in the Bonaigua valley or the freeriding opportunities to the left-hand side of the Chozas chairlift. Heliskiing is also available and, many say, the cheapest you’ll find anywhere in Europe.

Freestylers won’t be left wanting: the terrain park above Beret has kickers and rails aplenty and its own halfpipe for you to throw your best shapes off.

Baqueira Beret Apres Ski

The beauty of skiing in a Spanish resort is hands down the all-night-long, Spanish après!

Baq isn’t a huge resort, but it has built an extensive collection of quality drinking spots. Start off with a glass of fizz at Beret’s chic Moet Lounge and then head down to El Refugi de San Miguel, which serves blissfully cold (you guessed it) San Miguel. To really make like a local though, order a cremate - a hot brandy and popular Catalonian tipple.

Dinner tends to start at after 9 in Spain and consists mainly of snack-sized plates, but for something more substantial sink your teeth into one of the wild boar steaks at Ticolet, definitely the reason this is the resort’s longest running restaurant. Take a detour down to some of the older villages, like nearby Tredòs, for some of the best tapas around. Bar Saburedo serves outstanding traditional Aranese mini dishes these are often heavy on gamey meats like rabbit, though vegetarians will feel just as at home with a plate of patatas bravas or a succulent tortilla. Be sure to brush up on some basic Spanish or Catalan as the staff most likely won’t speak much English.

The night’s still young at 12 in Spanish eyes, when most of the crowd migrates from dinner to dancing. For a more sophisticated après scene that continues late into the night, try the Tuc Nere at the Tuc Blanc. Tiffany’s is the best nightclub outside of the lower villages - it starts to get busy after midnight and stays that way in to the early hours. Wherever you end up, buses run between the villages and on previous visits the taxis have been surprisingly affordable, sparing designated drivers.

But Baq isn’t all about drinking. For more subdued day-time off slope action, the hidden valleys and mountain passes to the serene Dossau forest or ancient abandoned village of Montgarri are waiting to be explored by snowmobile or 12-dog sleigh, or simply venture out on snowshoes and find a secluded to spot to admire the scenery. Quieter still, the naturally thermal water of the Banhs de Tredós Spa might be just the thing to soothe your aches and pains after a day on the hill or, closer by, the spa at the Hotel Meliá Royal in Tanau is a close second best.

Further down the valley, you can make use of Vielha’s fully-stocked sports centre for a heated swimming pool, ice rink, gym and sauna.

Best time to go

Best time to ski Baqueira Beret

When is the best time to ski Baqueira Beret?

If you like to ski later in the season for the longer days, it’s worth knowing that this part of the Pyrenees gets an extra hour’s sunlight each day - even the deep mid winter’s usually lovely and bright.

With a minimum altitude of 1500m and highs of up to 2516m, the snow that falls here is likely to last. And while the majority of slopes are west-facing, the nature of the resort’s winding and divergent path through the Aran Valley means there’s also a fair amount of north and south facing terrain. As a result, even in the brightest sunshine there’s usually superb snow to be found- and in case of emergency, the 600+ snow cannons throughout the resort should help you sleep easier on the days before arrival.

This is reflected in an impressive history of snow depth: 431cm in March 2013, and a more recent 374cm in March 2015 is nothing to be scoffed at. Combine this with its inclination for more sunny weather than you might expect makes this area of the Pyrenees a pretty attractive prospect from December through April- but if you want the best from Baqueira we recommend heading over in February or March.

Peak Dates

When it comes to Christmas in Baquiera, snow, dog-sleighs and brilliant food have been the order of the week in recent seasons. Browse Baqueira Beret Christmas ski holidays ‣

Torch-lit descents, fireworks and parties til 7am – if it’s anything like previous years, the Spanish-style New Year’s in Baqueira is an experience you won’t soon forget. Browse Baqueira Beret New Year ski holidays ‣

Half term in Baqueira – this is likely to be one of the least crowded (not to mention best) resorts in Europe this week! Browse Baqueira Beret Half Term ski holidays ‣

A strong snow history that lasts to the end of April and the most sunny days in the Pyrenees is why Easter in Baqueira is known to give the best of both. Browse Baqueira Beret Easter ski holidays ‣

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Families in Baqueira Beret

One reason we love family skiing in Baqueira is that whether it be Christmas, half term or Easter, you’re likely to forget overcrowding was ever a problem in the school holidays.

But don’t think this comes at a compromise: the Spanish Pyrenees have ski terrain that’s hugely varied and top-notch in quality as well. A beginner park above Baqueira 1500 is the perfect setting for kids to find their first ski legs, and the spectrum continues to rise from the most softly spoken of blue pistes to adrenaline-filled reds and bold, bellowing black runs. If any of you plan on taking lessons, the local Baqueira British Ski School comes with glowing recommendations!

Here you won’t find roaring après ski antics of the kind you’re used to in St Anton or Verbier, but instead one that builds up through the afternoon and evening with vino and tapas. While the locals might only sit down for dinner at 10pm, restaurants will happily seat you earlier.

Activities here go way beyond ski/drink/eat – snowshoeing, dog-sledding and snowmobiling are all options here or head down the valley to Vielha to use their swimming pool and ice rink.

GroupsGroup Holidays Baqueira Beret

The variety of entertainment both on and off the pistes of Baqueira Beret make it a strong candidate for a jolly good group trip. Within just two ski lift’s journey out of the main village, everyone from the timid first-timer to the mount-olympus shredder should find a slope that takes their fancy. The Rabada beginners park (just a short chairlift above Baq’ 1500) will have learners moving confidently towards their first blues in no time, while the experts can head straight to the top to plummet down the Escornacrabes couloir.

If a party’s what you’re after then look no further- in this mountain town apres is a seven hour marathon crawl of wine and tapas bars all leading up to nightlife that only kicks off past midnight, when the mild mannered have long since hit the hay.

The Hotel Tuc Blanc is only 20m away from the Bosque and Baqueira lifts and has a range of rooms to fit your needs. By the end of a week here you’ll be taking it for granted that the Tuc Nere – one of the most popular apres bars in town – is essentially on your doorstep, not to mention a traditional tapas bar and evening restaurant.

Somehow get bored of the 153km of groomers? Head to the tourist office and try your hand at snowmobile or dog-sleigh riding.

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